89.1 WEMU

Art & Soul - The Culinary Arts: Growing "Slow Food," Eating Unprocessed Food Grown Locally

Sep 6, 2018

Owner of “Slow Farm” organic farm Kim Bayer
Credit Lisa Barry / 89.1 WEMU

This week, "Art and Soul" is about the culinary arts.  89.1 WEMU's Lisa Barry is  joined by Jessica Webster and local organic farmer Kim Bayer to talk about “slow food” and growing pure organic fruits and vegetables.


Kim Bayer, a former MLive food critic, is the owner of Slow Farms.  Bayer considers Michigan a haven for organic farming, due to its quality soil and climate.  So, she started Slow Farms with the purpose of encouraging more organic farming through hard work (or, as Bayer put it, "touching the soil") and through networking.  

Throughout the year, Slow Farms harvests all kinds of crops, such as strawberries, ground cherries, pumpkins, herbs, and flowers.  

Close-up on tomatoes brought in for sampling for this week’s Art and Soul.
Credit Lisa Barry / 89.1 WEMU

What it may be best known for is growing over 30 varieties of tomatoes, some of which can't be found in most grocery stores.  You can find some of these special tomato varieties at Argus Farm Stop or at Silvio’s Italian Ristorante.

To learn more about Slow Farm, you can follow it on its Facebook page.  You can also learn more about what seeds the company uses and how to purchase them here.

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— Lisa Barry is the host of All Things Considered on WEMU. You can contact Lisa at 734.487.3363, on Twitter @LisaWEMU, or email her at lbarryma@emich.edu