89.1 WEMU

water safety

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Environmentalists are exceedingly unhappy about Enbridge Energy's safety measure proposals for oil pipelines running through the Straits of Mackinac.  WEMU's David Fair talks with two such leaders about those concerns.  Lisa Wozniak is executive director of the Michigan League of Conservation Voters and Liz Kirkwood serves as executive director of FLOW, an acronym for "For Love Of Water." 


Adam Zemke
Courtesy Photo / housedems.com

Since the Flint Water Crisis we have all, at some point, questioned the safety of our water.  That crisis is still being addressed and serves as a cautionary tale for what can happen around the rest of the state.  In this week’s "Issues of the Environment," WEMU’s David Fair talks with 55th District State Representative Adam Zemke about the health of our water and what needs to be done.


Ann Arbor Public Schools
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The Ann Arbor Public Schools Board of Education will meet tonight to discuss the 2016-2017 school year general fund budget.
 


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The University of Michigan’s research in human and environmental health is of global import.  Should the university “think local” as well?  In this segment of WEMU’s “The Green Room,” Barbara Lucas looks at the University of Michigan and the Ann Arbor area’s 1,4-dioxane contamination. 

 


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

For almost thirty years, a “responsible party” (Gelman Sciences, Inc.) has been legally and financially responsible for the 1, 4 dioxane contamination of  groundwater inthe Ann Arbor area.  This is in contrast to many contamination sites where cleanup falls totally on taxpayers. But the plume remains, and some question if enough resources are being devoted to its remediation.  In this installment of WEMU’s “The Green Room,” Barbara Lucas looks at money, and how it impacts Ann Arbor’s contamination problem. 


Roger Rayle / Scio Citizens for Safe Water

Local citizens and scientists have amassed large amounts of information on Ann Arbor’s 1,4-Dioxane plume. Locally sourced information has been invaluable since University of Michigan student Dan Bicknell first discovered the plume.  It has continued with 23 years of data collection by Roger Rayle of Scio Residents for Safe Water.  Has the information been put to good use?  Has it informed decision-makers?  In this installment of WEMU’s “The Green Room,” Barbara Lucas continues her exploration of this ongoing issue. 


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

In the past two decades, Michigan’s dioxane standards have seen extremes, going from 3 to 85 parts per billion (ppb).  Now 7.2 ppb is being proposed by the MDEQ.  Other states' standards are all over the map.  The EPA’s current recommended levels for dioxane exposure vary greatly as well, depending on multiple factors.   In this installment of WEMU’s “The Green Room,” Barbara Lucas looks at some reasons why it is so hard to come up with uniform guidelines for safe levels of dioxane.


Yousef Rabhi
Patrik Holubik / 89.1 WEMU

There is a long road ahead to adequately address an expanding 1,4 dioxane plume in the Ann Arbor area. The plume has contaminated wells in Scio township and Ann Arbor and is slowly moving towards the city's municipal water supply at Barton Pond. In this month's '1st Friday Focus on the Environment',  Liza Wozniak talks with Washtenaw County Commissioner Yousef Rabhi about the next steps in the journey.  


Roger Rayle / Scio Residents For Safe Water

In the United States, approximately 10 million pounds of 1,4-dioxane are produced each year.  It is being detected in groundwater at dozens of sites across the country.  Once thought to be relatively benign, new science says otherwise.  Costs to clean it up are high, and communities are grappling with how to deal with it.  In this installment of  “The Green Room,” WEMU  explores the experiences of two cities:  Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Tucson, Arizona.