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A Rare, Fall Full Moon Can Be Viewed At Local Astronomy Event

Sep 11, 2019

Harvest Moon
Credit Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

It's rare for the so-called "Harvest Moon" to fall on Friday the 13th, but that's what is happening this year.  WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about the fall full moon and the upcoming "Astronomy At The Beach" opportunity for skywatchers to watch and learn about astronomy.


Dr. Brian Ottum
Credit Lisa Barry / 89.1 WEMU

About the Recent Northern Lights

"Auroras occur when solar wind particles interact with earth's magnetosphere, then collide with other particles in the atmosphere and release energy to create the dazzling color display we know as the northern lights. While auroras form over earth's magnetic poles, the northern lights can be visible from as far south as the continental United States during larger geomagnetic storms, according to NOAA."

About the Harvest Moon

This is the full moon that near or at the fall equinox.  The advantage this full moon has is, despite occuring on shorter days, provides more light in the evening.  Farmers would take advantage of this to harvest their crops.

Astronomy at the Beach 2019

This is the largest astronomy event in the state of Michigan, and all astronomy clubs will be represented.  Over 60 telescopes will be in place where residents can just enjoy the wonders of the night sky.  You will also get a chance to make homemade comets out of dry ice.  The event takes Friday, September 13th and Saturday, September 14 from 6 PM-midnight at the Island Lake State Recreational Area near Brighton.

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— Lisa Barry is the host of All Things Considered on WEMU. You can contact Lisa at 734.487.3363, on Twitter @LisaWEMU, or email her at lbarryma@emich.edu