All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Lisa Barry who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

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A group of female Marines has graduated from a San Diego boot camp for the first time. That's right, the first time. And it was congressionally mandated. Steve Walsh with KPBS in San Diego has more.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Lisa Barry / 89.1 WEMU

Just a few weeks ago, Ann Arbor Art Fair organizers were "cautiously optimistic" they may be able to hold the art fair this coming July. But they have now decided it will not be taking place for the second year in a row, due to the pandemic.

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with the the executive director of the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair, The Original, Maureen Riley, about the decision and community impact.

  

Mike Schade
Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families / saferchemicals.org

A new report released today by the Mind the Store campaign (a partner organization of the Ecology Center in Ann Arbor) finds significant chemical policy improvement. Nearly 70% of companies surveyed have better chemical safety programs now compared to their first evaluation dating as far back as 2016. Mike Schade is director of the campaign and joined by WEMU's David Fair to discuss the ongoing efforts to remove chemical hazards from consumer products. 

  


Doug Coombe / Concentrate Media

Whether it was performing on the virtual stage or via Zoom, Ypsilanti area theatre groups have had to be even more creative than usual during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Lisa Barry and Sarah Rigg talk with Kristin Danko from Ypsilanti's Neighborhood Theatre Group about how they responded to the global health crisis and still kept the shows going.

To call an actor a Hollywood legend sounds like hyperbole, but Norman Lloyd really was.

He died Tuesday at his home in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, according to his manager, Marion Rosenberg, as quoted by the Associated Press.

Norman Lloyd, born in 1914, got his start performing with the Federal Theatre Project, part of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal in the 1930s. It employed hundreds of out of work actors. Lloyd, the son of a Jersey City store manager, soon started acting with Orson Welles at his acclaimed Mercury Theatre.

Tanitoluwa Adewumi, a 10-year-old in New York, just became the country's newest national chess master.

At the Fairfield County Chess Club Championship tournament in Connecticut on May 1, Adewumi won all four of his matches, bumping his chess rating up to 2223 and making him the 28th youngest person to become a chess master, according to US Chess.

"I was very happy that I won and that I got the title," he says, "I really love that I finally got it."

Updated at 6:43 pm ET

A federal bankruptcy judge dismissed an effort by the National Rifle Association to declare bankruptcy on Tuesday, ruling that the gun rights group had not filed the case in good faith.

The ruling slams the door on the NRA's attempt to use bankruptcy laws to evade New York officials seeking to dissolve the organization. In his decision, the federal judge said that "using this bankruptcy case to address a regulatory enforcement problem" was not a permitted use of bankruptcy.

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When the pandemic began and lots of people moved to remote work, some also moved full stop to new places - places they would rather live in far from the offices they had long been tied to.

COVID-19
CDC / cdc.gov

There is progress in the ongoing fight against the coronavirus. Vaccinations are being expanded to include more younger people, and employers will soon be allowed to return to in-person work. Soon, more social restrictions will be lifted. For a local perspective, WEMU's David Fair discussed the latest developments with Washtenaw County Health Department spokesperson Susan Ringler-Cerniglia.

 

 

UMS
Jessica Griffin / UMS

After a year of no in-person performances due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of Michigan Musical Society, known as UMS, is announcing its next season, which will include some live events.

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with UMS president Matthew VanBesien about what is being offered for the 2021-22 UMS season.


A year after slashing spending to fill a record-breaking deficit spurred by the pandemic, California Gov. Gavin Newsom is eyeing a massive surplus and hopes to send out a second, larger round of stimulus checks to residents.

"It's a remarkable, remarkable turnaround," Newsom said in an interview with All Things Considered Monday.

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Before Little Richard, there was Lloyd Price, a pioneer of rock 'n' roll.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PERSONALITY")

LLOYD PRICE: (Singing) 'Cause you've got - walk - talk - smile...

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Dawn Richard grew up in New Orleans. Her father sang in a funk band called Chocolate Milk. He still does.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FRICTION")

CHOCOLATE MILK: (Singing) Friction, baby.

SHAPIRO: As a kid, she was kind of alternative.

Ebony Parker-Featherstone
Michigan Medicine / uofmhealth.org

Throughout history, women have been the primary caregivers. All too often, it comes at the cost of their own physical and mental health. Dr. Ebony Parker-Featherstone is an assistant professor of family medicine at the University of Michigan. She joined WEMU's David Fair to discusses ways for women to improve self-care. 


Wikimedia Commons

The future of mobility will be the focus of a panel discussion taking place Tuesday at Washtenaw Community College.

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Rapper Esoteric On New Album 'Super What?'

May 9, 2021

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Life Kit: How To Pick A Baby Name

May 9, 2021

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It's Mother's Day. And if you're expecting a child, you have a decision ahead of you - what to name your new baby. Thankfully, NPR Life Kit reporter Diana Opong has put together a framework to help new parents make that process a little smoother.

Food World Ramps Up The War On Meat

May 8, 2021

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