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Sue Shink wins the 14th District State Senate Democratic primary

Sue Shink
Sue Shink

TRANSCRIPTION:

David Fair: This is 89 one WEMU. And as we approach the end of a post-primary election Morning Edition, we have one more conversation to bring you. I'm David Fair. And voters in the newly drawn 14th District State Senate area have selected the current chair of the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners as the Democratic nominee. Sue Shink beat out Val Cochran Toops and Kelsey Heck Wood yesterday. And thank you so much for the time today. We appreciate you joining us.

Sue Shink: Thank you. I'm glad to be able to talk with you.

David Fair: So, you've been serving in a variety of capacities throughout Washtenaw County for a couple of decades. Northfield Township Trustee. You've been on the Board of Commissioners since 2019. And all of that is within the county borders. How does your mindset have to change when you consider representing areas outside of Washtenaw County?

Sue Shink: Well, you know, people in Washtenaw County and Jackson County are excited for a state senator who really cares and will take the time to get to know them and work with them to address the challenges in their lives. That's why I'm running for state Senate. So, I just started spending a lot of time in Jackson County, getting to know the people in Jackson County, and it's just service.

David Fair: So, what have you learned about Jackson County and spending time campaigning there?

Sue Shink: I've learned that there are a lot of people in Jackson County who feel that their government hasn't really been working for them, and I'm working to change that.

David Fair: We're talking with the winner of the Democratic primary in the 14th District State Senate race, Sue Shink. And in the general election, you will face someone from Jackson, Republican Tim Golding. Do you see obstacles in overcoming the kind of county borderline barrier that might divide you?

Sue Shink: No, I really don't. I live in a fairly rural area and have for the last 20 years while I've also been engaged in the life of Ann Arbor and the other towns around us. And I'm spending a lot of time in Jackson County getting to know people, understanding the issues there. And, no, I really don't see any barriers. I see possibilities, and I'm really excited about those and so are the residents of Jackson and Washtenaw County.

David Fair: Now, I know you won't just be campaigning for yourself heading to November. Democrats hope to collectively try and take control of the state House and Senate. A lot of ground to make up there. What are the issues that you believe can give Democrats and yourself the best opportunity of achieving those goals?

Sue Shink: So, as I said, representation that really serves and then keeping government out of personal medical decisions, especially the right to an abortion, the rights of all people to be treated with fairness and dignity, regardless of race, gender identity, sexual orientation, or income. And gun safety. Those are issues that are really top of mind for so many people. And then, you know, investing in our families, our schools, our infrastructures, our communities, and really people want government that they can turn their back on for a few moments to spend time with their job or their family or their hobbies and know that nothing crazy is going to happen while they're not looking.

David Fair: Well, I thank you for spending some time with us today.

Sue Shink: Thank you. It's a pleasure to talk with you.

David Fair: That is Sue Shink. She is the winner of the Democratic primary race for the newly drawn 14th District State Senate seat. She will challenge Republican Tim Golding of Jackson in the November general election. Golding was unopposed on Tuesday. I'm David Fair, and this is your community NPR station, 89 one WEMU.

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Nearly three-quarters of David Fair’s 20+ years in radio has been at WEMU. Since 1994, he has been on the air at 5am each weekday on 89.1 FM as the local host of NPR’s Morning Edition. Over the years, Fair has had the opportunity to interview nationally and internationally known politicians, activists and celebrities. But he feels the most important features and interviews have been with those who live and work here at home. He believes his professional passions and desires fit perfectly into WEMU’s commitment to serving a local audience.
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