Art

Tammy Jones / Wonderland Sugar Cookies

An Ann Arbor woman followed her dreams and pursued her passions by creating "Wonderland Cookies."  Using her great grandmother's recipe, Tammy Jones bakes sugar cookies that look like edible works of art. Her cookies will be included in the upcoming Westside Art Hop taking place this weekend in Ann Arbor. She talks with WEMU's Lisa Barry about her cookie business.


Rashaun Rucker / rashaunrucker.com

This week, "Art and Soul" is about the visual arts.  WEMU's Lisa Barry and the executive director of CultureSource, Omari Rush, talk with artist Rashaun Rucker about his current exhibit at the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities Gallery. It compares the life and origins of the rock pigeon to the stereotypes and myths of the constructed identities of Black men in the United States. 


CultureVerse
CultureVerse

Sitting at the intersection of art and technology, local entrepreneur Don Hicks wondered how SaganWorks 3-D technology could make it possible for anyone to view the work of artists from anywhere. Being one to take action, he started the nonprofit CultureVerse to figure it out. Aubrey Martinson was enlisted as executive director, and she explains it all when she joins co-hosts Deb Polich of Creative Washtenaw and WEMUs David Fair on this edition of "creative:impact." 


9/11
Deb Polich / Creative Washtenaw

With the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approaching, there is still much reflection on the impact of what happened, and it is still a solemn occasion for many. The arts played a powerful role in engaging in and healing from the tragedy, but what impact might that still be having now...20 years later?

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with the president of the University of Michigan University Musical Society, Matthew VanBesien, about the ongoing arts and cultural impact of 9/11, both nationally and on the local community.


Deb Polich / Creative Washtenaw

What we’d once hoped was going to be a short little dance number, COVID-19 has turned into a dance marathon. Deb Polich of Creative Washtenaw and WEMU’s David Fair talk about the state of arts + creative industry, now 18 months into this pandemic, on this edition of "creative:impact."


Douglas Madaras

As an artist and an award winning architectural designer, Douglas Madaras of Ann Arbor says love is what inspires his work and gives him the strength to move forward while facing many of life’s challenges.

He talks with WEMU’s Lisa Barry about his love-centric art and how he taps into a greater sense of purpose in the work he does and in his many different artistic expressions.


Holli Andrews
Holli Andrews

Meet Holli Andrews, the enthusiastic, talented director of Saline Main Street. A community booster second to none, she is salting downtown Saline with art to create lively local scenes. A visit to Saline is in your future after hearing Holli on this week's "creative:impact" with show co-hosts Deb Polich of Creative Washtenaw and WEMU’s David Fair.


United Way of Washtenaw County / uwwashtenaw.org

America still struggles with reconciling its slave-owning past. An exhibit at the University of Michigan Museum of Art, entitled "Unsettling Histories: Legacies of Slavery and Colonialism," is designed to open further discussion on the topic. WEMU's David Fair spoke with UMMA assistant curator of global contemporary arts Ozi Uduma about the impact art can have on how we deal with race and racism in our present and future.


Leif Sporck / sporcktileart.com

Leif Spörck says he felt compelled and pulled by the heart to keep the family pottery business going. He played basketball in college and thought about becoming a lawyer but decided to return to northern Michigan and create decorative, ceramic art tiles with the root of his work in nature.

He shares his story with WEMU's Lisa Barry about his tiles, which he sells up north and at art fairs around the state.


Molly Motherwell / 89.1 WEMU

From her artist’s booth, Karin Wagner Coron had perfect view of the 2021 Ann Arbor Art Fair. In the second of this two-part series, Karin paints a picture of her experience, how it went, what was the same, what was different, and how it felt to be back on the streets selling art after a one-year, Art Fair hiatus caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Hear it all as she joins "creative:impact’s" co-hosts, Creative Washtenaw’s Deb Polich and WEMU’s David Fair.


Karin Wagner Coron

Karin Wagner Coron has exhibited at the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair for years. She has a routine: how many works to have in inventory and what to pack to be ready. Then, the COVID-19 pandemic caused the cancellation of last year’s Art Fair. In the first of a two-part series, Karin talks about that disruption and what she anticipates for the 2021 Art Fair. Next week, she’ll be back to tell "creative:impact’s" co-hosts, Creative Washtenaw’s Deb Polich and WEMU’s David Fair, how the Art Fair went.


Shadin Atiyeh
Jewish Family Services of Washtenaw County / jfsannarbor.org

Like memories of their beloved homeland, art remains within the heart and soul of refugee artists. Their art offers a way to connect new neighbors to the culture and stories of their past. World Refugee Day is Sunday, June 20, and a celebration of artists new to our land is being planned. Dr. Shadin Atiyeh of Jewish Family Services, the refugee resettlement agency in Washtenaw County, gives all the details to Creative Washtenaw's Deb Polich and WEMU's David Fair on this week's edition of "creative:impact." 


Cathryn Amidei

Like the distinct threads of a tapestry, 20-some individual artists have entwined for more than two decades to fashion the WSG Gallery. This artist-owned and operated gallery has withstood the winds of change and now a pandemic. Textile artist and member Cathryn Amidei takes us through WSG’s journey to the future when she joins Creative Washtenaw’s Deb Polich and WEMU’s David Fair on this week’s edition of "creative:impact."


Sophie Grillet/Leslie Sobel

With the official Ann Arbor Art Fair back on, several local artists will hold their own neighborhood preview arts events the weekend of June 11-13.

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Sophie Grillet, one of the organizers of the Westside Art Hop, and Leslie Sobel from an upcoming art pop-up about the two upcoming events happening in different parts of Ann Arbor on the same weekend.


Doug Coombe / Concentrate Media

Affordable housing and gentrification are just some of the issues addressed by an Ypsilanti arts advocacy program called "Staying Power." Lisa Barry and "On the Ground Ypsi" project manager Sarah Rigg talk with one of the participants, Malik Henry, who shares his experience and one of the poems he wrote as part of the project.

The Hosting / the-hosting.org

A special art exhibit is taking place in Ann Arbor this month, which could be considered a "partially post-pandemic art exhibition." Lisa Barry and Omari Rush talk with the organizer, Anya Klapischak, about what they're calling, "What Feels Real: Art in the Time of Impossible Disconnect."


Riverside Arts Center / riversidearts.org

Ypsilanti's Riverside Arts Center has launched a new residency to give local artists time and space to create and connect with the community. Lisa Barry and Sarah Rigg talk to Kristen Schrader, chair of the program committee at Riverside Arts Center, about the new program, which is already proving to be popular.

Doug Coombe / Concentrate Media

Due to the pandemic, last year's First Fridays program in Ypsilanti took place mostly online.  This year, they're adding some new components and plan to be outside more.  WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with "On the Ground Ypsi" project manager Sarah Rigg and the program coordinator for First Fridays, Mary Dettling, to find out how the community arts program will operate this year.

Shawn Bungo

Glass artist Shawn Bungo lives in Ypsilanti, where he created a neighborhood art exchange similar to the little libraries you see in some areas.

He talks with Lisa Barry about his idea and how it has helped him connect with his neighbors in the currently recommended, socially distanced way.


FoolMoon
WonderFool Productions / wonderfoolproductions.org

The annual FoolMoon public art and lighting event held in Ann Arbor had to pivot to an online experience last year, shortly after the start of the pandemic.  This year, it is "re-imagined" with an outdoor component meant to support local businesses with the theme "Shine Your Light A2."

Lisa Barry talks with event executive director Jennifer Goulet about what is planned for this year's FoolMoon event.


Mia Risberg

Before and after COVID-19.  It is how we mark time now.  Mia Risberg joins "creative:impact" co-hosts Deb Polich and David Fair to talk about her visual artist practice before and after COVID hit, how she revitalized her work, and found reward through the unlimited boundaries of the Internet.  Hear her story here.


Myra Klarman

From outdoor museum tours to indoor Zoom art creations, there will be a number of opportunities provided by what is being called "UMMA + Chill."  WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Mark Tucker, founder and creative director of FestiFools and FoolMoon, about what he will be doing as part of the University of Michigan Museum of Art event.


Andrew Da Silva / U Magazine

Ypsilanti resident Christian Usera is publishing an international magazine featuring art and artists.  Lisa Barry and Sarah Rigg talk to him about his unique background and his effort to bring attention to art and the work of artists of color and other marginalized groups in "U Magazine." 


Nisson
Nisson Glass Art / nissonglassart.com

Larry Nisson is a former psychotherapist who has been making glass art in Ann Arbor for over 30 years.  He decided a few months ago to commission local glass artists to make glass art, so he could give it away to local nonprofits to "anchor them in positivity" at this difficult time.

Lisa Barry talks with him about his idea, the inspiration behind it, and the reaction to his glass art giveaway.


YCS

Artwork produced by Ypsilanti Community Schools students is on display at six local businesses after their original show in Washington D.C. was cancelled, due to COVID-19.  

#OTGYpsi: Out Of Pain Comes Purpose

Oct 28, 2020
Doug Coombe / Concentrate Media

Ypsilanti residents Yoland and Keith Ragland were in shock after losing their 19-year-old son to gun violence in 2017, but they channeled their energy into a vision for an arts education nonprofit called Elevation Youth Corp., one they hope can benefit Ypsilanti-area children much like their son.

WEMU's Lisa Barry and Sarah Rigg from "On the Ground-Ypsi" talk to Yolanda about their efforts and how they hope it benefits the Ypsilanti area community.


John Gutoskey

This week, "Art and Soul" is about the visual arts.  WEMU's Lisa Barry and state and local arts leader Omari Rush talk with Marie Klopf, founder and CEO of the Ann Arbor Art Center, about how they have been able to survive and even thrive during the current pandemic.  There is also discussion about two local art exhibits, both including the work of Ann Arbor artist John Gutoskey.  


Jorge Avellan / WEMU

During a time when self-identity is becoming more important, a new trend of having personalized art on your shoes is growing.  An Ypsilanti artist is using his skills to meet that demand by repurposing old shoes and making them into a work of art.  89.1 WEMU's Jorge Avellan visited the local artist.


Jorge Avellan / 89.1 WEMU

An Ypsilanti man has taken his love for vintage discarded materials and has turned it into art.  But not just any type of art, he’s making robot-like creations out of them.  89.1 WEMU’s Jorge Avellan paid a visit to his workshop to watch the process of unique creation.  


Yen Azzaro

Ypsilanti artist Yen Azzaro has participated in a number of different local art projects and has done graphic artistry for the Ford Motor Company, The Kresge Foundation, and Eastern Michigan University among others.  She used her skills to create special signs for several area homeless people to provide them with a human connection and hope for a better future.

She shares more about the project she refers to as "homeless and hopeful" with 89.1 WEMU's Lisa Barry.


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