astronomy

Perseid
Dr. Brian Ottum

They're considered the best meteor showers of the year, and local amateur astronomer and member of the University of Michigan Lowbrow Astronomers Dr. Brian Ottum says they are peaking later this week. Lisa Barry talks with Dr. Ottum about where and when to view the annual meteor shower which he says should be easier to see this year due to the phase of the moon.


Supermoon
Old Farmer's Almanac / almanac.com

Buying a telescope has become increasingly more difficult over the past year due to the pandemic. People are finding skygazing a safe, socially-distanced thing to do during the global health crisis, and interest is skyrocketing.  Lisa Barry talks with Eastern Michigan University professor and director of the Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance about what will be visible in the night sky coming up in the next few weeks.


Leonid
Brian Ottum

To distract us from everything going on in our worlds, there is another meteor shower that will be visible in the early morning sky peaking this week.

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about what we might see and when and were to look for the "Leonid" meteors.

Meteor Shower
Brian Ottum

The Orionid Meteors should be visible Tuesday, October 20th in the night sky.  The moon sometimes impedes the view, but that is not expected to be the case this year.  WEMU’s Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about the meteors and the recent phenomenal view of Mars in the night sky.


Brian Ottum
Brian Ottum

If you heard or checked the weather forecast but looked outside and saw something different, it’s not your imagination.  Smoke from the west coast fires in the United States is moving into our area, according to local sky watcher and amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum.

 

Lisa Barry talks with Dr. Ottum about our current sky view, as well as about some upcoming exciting planetary views and the annual "Astronomy On The Beach" event.


NEOWISE
Sky & Telescope

Wednesday, July 22nd is Comet NEOWISE'S closest approach to Earth, then it will slowly move away and be pretty easily viewable for about another week.

WEMU's Lisa Barry checks in with Eastern Michigan University astronomy professor and director of Eastern's Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance for viewing tips and information about this rare comet appearance in the nighttime sky.


Comet
Glenn Kaatz

Some astronomers compare comets to cats.  They both have tails and are very hard to predict.

A recently discovered comet called NEOWISE can be seen even without binoculars in our area through July 23rd along the horizon in the northwest sky.

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about the rare comet viewing and the best way to try and see it.


Mike Lewinski

Sky watchers will have several things to look for this week.


Moon
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

It's rare for the so-called "Harvest Moon" to fall on Friday the 13th, but that's what is happening this year.  WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about the fall full moon and the upcoming "Astronomy At The Beach" opportunity for skywatchers to watch and learn about astronomy.


Brian Ottum

Several “celestial events” will be available to see in the night sky over the next week or so.  WEMU’s Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum who explains what planets will appear close to the moon in the coming days and shares tips for seeing the annual Perseid meteor showers.


Matthew Linke
Matthew Linke

It’s easy to get wrapped up in the awe-inspiring view of the universe from the seats of the Planetarium and Dome Theater at the new U-M Natural History Museum, but have you ever wondered what goes into designing these programs?  Planetarium manager Matthew Linke takes us into his stratosphere where imagination has no bounds on this week’s "creative:impact" with WEMU’s David Fair and The Art Alliance’s Deb Polich.


Lunar Eclipse
Brian Ottum

A rare, total lunar eclipse will be visible from our area Sunday evening, January 20th.  89.1 WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about what to expect.


Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

As summer comes to a close, local astronomers and sky watchers have enjoyed some rare and interesting planetary displays.  89.1 WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with local amateur astronomer and member of the University of Michigan "Lowbrow Astronomers" group, Dr. Brian Ottum.


TD Tooker / University of Michigan Bentley Historical Library

Atop a small hill at the corner of Observatory and East Ann Streets in Ann Arbor sits a facility operated by the University of Michigan’s Bentley Historical Library.  It’s been at that same location for over a century now.  Still, as 89-1 WEMU’s Jorge Avellan reports, the Detroit Observatory has remained largely “Hidden in Plain Sight.”  


Lisa Barry

There will be some rare astronomical events happening over the next several days.

89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry spoke with local amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about what we might see...


Dr. Brian Ottum

While we're spending a lot of our time and energy surviving the January winter weather, there is a lot going on in the sky above us.

Local amateur astronomer and member of the University of Michigan Lowbrow Astronomers Dr. Brian Ottum spoke to 89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry about the local siting of a rare blue comet and the upcoming blue moon and lunar eclipse.


www.nightearth.com

No matter who we are or where we live, all human being have one thing in common:  we all have the night sky above us.  But can we actually see it?  Studies say nowadays only 20% of the world’s population lives somewhere dark enough to see the heavens untouched by light pollution.  Luckily, this is one form of pollution that can be reversed.  Join Barbara Lucas as she explores how.


National Park Service

Did you get a chance to watch the recent solar eclipse?  If you did, according to University of Michigan researchers, you were among an unparalleled size crowd united in watching one event.


Lisa Barry

In our ongoing series highlighting people and places in our community that are "Hidden in Plain Sight,"  89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry takes you on a visit to the home of a Saline man. Dr. Brian Ottum operates a New Mexico desert telescope, by remote control, from his basement, taking pictures of astronomical phenomena without ever leaving the comfort of his home. 


WikiMedia Commons

It is the first total eclipse happening in nearly 40 years but will only be partially visible from Southeast Michigan.  I spoke with Eastern Michigan University professor and director of Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance about what we can expect to see and experience when the eclipse occurs on August 21st.

Brian D. Ottum, Ph.D.

Dr. Brian Ottum is a member of the University of Michigan Lowbrow Astronomers Club and co-author of a research paper on comets.  He explains what three sky events are happening tonight and what might be visible and where.


Jon Bunting

I spoke with Eastern Michigan University professor and director of the Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance about the Harvest Moon, occurring Friday night, September 16th.


Tamer Shabani Photography

The annual sky show known as the "Perseid Meteor Shower" takes place this week.

I spoke with Norbert Vance, director of the Sherzer Observatory at Eastern Michigan University, about what to expect... and when...


Eastern Michigan University

It hasn't happened in ten years... a rare passage of the planet Mercury in front of the sun called a "Mercury Transit."

It won't be visible with the naked eye but can be seen from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m. this afternoon through a telescope with a proper sun filter.

Eastern Michigan University's Sherzer Observatory will be open for viewing.  EMU astronomer Norbert Vance describes what they hope to see.


QHyseni / Creative Commons

It will be another exciting event for sky watchers this weekend. There will be a total lunar eclipse Sunday evening, the last one visible from our area until May of 2019.

Norbert Vance is a professor and director of the Sherzer Observatory at Eastern Michigan University. Some people are calling it a "Super Moon" professor Vance calls it a "pumpkin moon"

Navicore / Creative Commons

It's an annual sky show, the Perseid Meteor Showers should be at their peak visibility tonight.

Wikimedia commons

 A rare "Blue Moon" will be visible in southeast Michigan.  The moon won't actually appear blue, but gets it's name because it is only visible every 2 to 3 years.

I had the chance to speak to the director of the Sherzer Observatory at Eastern Michigan University, Norbert Vance and he shares information on a number of interesting things visible right now in the night sky.