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astronomy

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As summer comes to a close, local astronomers and sky watchers have enjoyed some rare and interesting planetary displays.  89.1 WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with local amateur astronomer and member of the University of Michigan "Lowbrow Astronomers" group, Dr. Brian Ottum.


TD Tooker / University of Michigan Bentley Historical Library

Atop a small hill at the corner of Observatory and East Ann Streets in Ann Arbor sits a facility operated by the University of Michigan’s Bentley Historical Library.  It’s been at that same location for over a century now.  Still, as 89-1 WEMU’s Jorge Avellan reports, the Detroit Observatory has remained largely “Hidden in Plain Sight.”  


Lisa Barry

There will be some rare astronomical events happening over the next several days.

89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry spoke with local amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about what we might see...


Dr. Brian Ottum

While we're spending a lot of our time and energy surviving the January winter weather, there is a lot going on in the sky above us.

Local amateur astronomer and member of the University of Michigan Lowbrow Astronomers Dr. Brian Ottum spoke to 89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry about the local siting of a rare blue comet and the upcoming blue moon and lunar eclipse.


www.nightearth.com

No matter who we are or where we live, all human being have one thing in common:  we all have the night sky above us.  But can we actually see it?  Studies say nowadays only 20% of the world’s population lives somewhere dark enough to see the heavens untouched by light pollution.  Luckily, this is one form of pollution that can be reversed.  Join Barbara Lucas as she explores how.


National Park Service

Did you get a chance to watch the recent solar eclipse?  If you did, according to University of Michigan researchers, you were among an unparalleled size crowd united in watching one event.


Lisa Barry

In our ongoing series highlighting people and places in our community that are "Hidden in Plain Sight,"  89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry takes you on a visit to the home of a Saline man. Dr. Brian Ottum operates a New Mexico desert telescope, by remote control, from his basement, taking pictures of astronomical phenomena without ever leaving the comfort of his home. 


WikiMedia Commons

It is the first total eclipse happening in nearly 40 years but will only be partially visible from Southeast Michigan.  I spoke with Eastern Michigan University professor and director of Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance about what we can expect to see and experience when the eclipse occurs on August 21st.

Brian D. Ottum, Ph.D.

Dr. Brian Ottum is a member of the University of Michigan Lowbrow Astronomers Club and co-author of a research paper on comets.  He explains what three sky events are happening tonight and what might be visible and where.


Jon Bunting

I spoke with Eastern Michigan University professor and director of the Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance about the Harvest Moon, occurring Friday night, September 16th.


Tamer Shabani Photography

The annual sky show known as the "Perseid Meteor Shower" takes place this week.

I spoke with Norbert Vance, director of the Sherzer Observatory at Eastern Michigan University, about what to expect... and when...


Eastern Michigan University

It hasn't happened in ten years... a rare passage of the planet Mercury in front of the sun called a "Mercury Transit."

It won't be visible with the naked eye but can be seen from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m. this afternoon through a telescope with a proper sun filter.

Eastern Michigan University's Sherzer Observatory will be open for viewing.  EMU astronomer Norbert Vance describes what they hope to see.


QHyseni / Creative Commons

It will be another exciting event for sky watchers this weekend. There will be a total lunar eclipse Sunday evening, the last one visible from our area until May of 2019.

Norbert Vance is a professor and director of the Sherzer Observatory at Eastern Michigan University. Some people are calling it a "Super Moon" professor Vance calls it a "pumpkin moon"

Navicore / Creative Commons

It's an annual sky show, the Perseid Meteor Showers should be at their peak visibility tonight.

Wikimedia commons

 A rare "Blue Moon" will be visible in southeast Michigan.  The moon won't actually appear blue, but gets it's name because it is only visible every 2 to 3 years.

I had the chance to speak to the director of the Sherzer Observatory at Eastern Michigan University, Norbert Vance and he shares information on a number of interesting things visible right now in the night sky.