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NASA/National Weather Service / MODIS/NASA, processed by NOAA/NOS/NCCOS)

The annual, summer algae bloom has hit Lake Erie.  That’s not all.  Agricultural run-off, in some way, affects many of Michigan’s rivers streams and more than 11, 000 inland lakes.  Explore the causes, impacts and search for solutions in this month’s edition of “1st Friday Focus on the Environment.”  Lisa Wozniak of the Michigan League of Conservation Voters and Tom Zimnicki of the Michigan Environmental Council share their perspectives with WEMU’s David Fair. 


FLOW

From spills in the Straits of Mackinac, to large-scale water diversions to tainted drinking water, Michigan has plenty of issues to address and remediate.  There are questions as to whether the political landscape will allow for the development of policies to adequetly do so.  Dave Dempsey has authored 10 environmental books and served on the Michigan Environmental Council.  Now, he is Senior Advisor for FLOW.  His perspective is on tap in this month's "1st Friday Focus on the Environment." 


www.michiganlcv.org

Proposals in both Lansing and Washington would make available publicly held lands for private enterprise. environmentalists are fighting regulatory rollbacks and cuts to funding health and sustainability programs. Those are among the topics David Fair addresses with Michigan League of Conservation Voters executive director, Lisa Wozniak, in this month's edition of WEMU's  "1st Friday Focus on the Environment," 


MLCV / http://michiganlcv.org/

As the federal and state government continuing ironing out their budget priorities, environmentalists are expressing concern over proposed funding and regulatory rollbacks. In this month's edition of WEMU's 1st Friday Focus on the Environment, David Fair discusses some of those concerns with Charlotte Jameson, Government Affairs Director at the Michigan League of Conservation Voters. 


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

For two decades the State of Michigan’s “containment” policy has allowed polluters to leave contamination in place rather than clean it up.  4,000 such “prohibition zones” exist in the state.  In our ongoing look in the Ann Arbor area's 1,4 dioxane plume, we look at the ramifications of that kind of policy.  


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

1,4-Dioxane is a suspected human carcinogen and a contaminant of “emerging concern” for the EPA.  It has been found in over a thousand public water supplies across the country, including thirty in Michigan.  Will those who’ve been exposed to Ann Arbor’s contaminated groundwater develop health issues?  It’s a question that may be of concern far beyond our borders, and the focus of our report in "The Green Room." 


the green room
Barbara Lucas - the Green Room / 89.1 WEMU

"Declare the Pall-Gelman 1, 4 dioxane plume a federal Superfund site."  That’s the message from the Sierra Club of Huron Valley.  The Sierra Club has passed a resolution urging the City of Ann Arbor and Washtenaw County to seek Superfund designation from the US Environmental Protection Agency. 

Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

In 1980 Congress created the Superfund to clean up hazardous waste sites that have passed criteria placing them on the “National Priorities List.” If and when funding becomes available for a site, the EPA works with the state’s DEQ to remediate it.  When polluters can’t be made to pay to clean them up, the Superfund pays, using taxpayer money. In Michigan, there are currently 65 sites on the National Priorities List.  Should Ann Arbor become one of them?

 


Courtesy photo / wikipedia

Remediation of an expanding 1, 4 dioxane plume continues, but the chemical continues to slowly spread towards the Huron river. That's the topic in this month's edition of '1st Friday Focus on the Environment.'  Lisa Wozniak is Executive Director of the Michigan League of Conservation Voters and host of the monthly feature. Her guest is 12th District Congresswoman Debbie Dingell. 


Volkswagen Clean Diesel
WikiMedia Commons

A Senior Fellow at the International Council on Clean Transportation in Ann Arbor knows exactly how Volkswagen got caught cheating emissions testing. John German, and his colleagues, commissioned the study that led to Volkswagen being caught. In this week's 'Issues of the Environment' Mr. German explains how it all happened, and what will happen next. 


Huron River Watershed Council / www.hrwc.org

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued  the new "Clean Water Rule." How does it impact Michigan and Washtenaw County? Find out in this 89.1 WEMU's 'Issues of the Environment.'