89.1 WEMU

Kalamazoo River

Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

As the recent disaster in Massachusetts shows, pipeline problems can cause fatal explosions.  But in Michigan, it’s the impact pipelines might have to our increasingly threatened water supplies that is drawing most of the attention.  This is the third of our “Green Room” series on pipelines.


Kevin Martini

Construction of the final 50 miles of an Enbridge oil pipeline replacement project in Michigan resumes in May. 

National Wildlife Federation's Great Lakes Regional Center

Water is one of the most important natural resources in Michigan. As a Great Lakes state, perhaps it's the most important. We are also spoiled with an amazing network of inland lakes, rivers and streams that enhance our quality of life in a myriad of ways. So, protecting this resource is something we think about often.  

Invasive species, pollution and water levels are some of the frequent conversations we engage in. What we discuss less frequently is vast number of oil pipelines that run through the state of Michigan near, and sometimes under our precious waterways. That's the topic in the March edition of WEMU's 1st Friday Focus on the Environment.  

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Jason W Lacey / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

This week marks three-years since an Enbridge pipe-line burst and spilled roughly a million gallons of oil in the Kalamazoo River. As WEMU's Andrew Cluley reports, all of this time later, and the expensive clean-up is still underway.