89.1 WEMU

racial equity

Brandon Tucker
United Way of Washtenaw County / uwwashtenaw.org

This past year has brought so much change to our community, from fighting the COVID-19 crisis to combatting racism and police brutality.  The United Way of Washtenaw County (UWWC) is working to creating equity in access to opportunity and quality of life by the year 2030.  UWWC campaign chair Brandon Tucker joined  WEMU's David Fair on "Washtenaw United" to discuss the work that needs to be done over the next decade to meet those aspirations. 


NEW
Nonprofit Enterprise at Work / new.org

All too often, when public discourse centers on issues of racial equality and justice, the voices we hear from are from white people.  Ann Arbor-based NEW (Nonprofit Enterprise at Work) is changing that by putting forth leaders in the Black community to lead the conversations.  The online series is called "Centering Justice."  Will Jones III is Relationship Manager at NEW.  He joined WEMU's David Fair on this week's edition of "Washtenaw United" to discuss racism and the task of creating meaningful and lasting change. 


United Way of Washtenaw County
United Way of Washtenaw County / uwwashtenaw.org

Managing finances can be difficult.  It becomes infinitely more difficult if there is very little money to work with.  COVID-19 has destroyed financial stability for a great many.  Add in issues of racial and economic oppression, and the difficulties are further compounded.  A grant secured via a partnership between the United Way of Washtenaw County (UWWC) and the Washtenaw County Office of Community and Economic Development will allow for further investment in teaching residents in need how to build a better financial future.  WEMU's David Fair talks to UWWC financial coach Ugbaad Keynan about the "Financial Navigation" initiative for this week's "Washtenaw United."


Reach Church / reachchurcha2y.org

A matter of race and faith.  Pastor Jason Robinson of Reach Church in Ypsilanti is ministering to an outraged and heartbroken congregation in the wake of yet another police killing of a black man.  Is this time different?  Will there be enough unity to make signifcant changes in systemic racism and bring an end to police brutality?  Perspective from a faith leader in this week's "Washtenaw United." 


Alize Asberry Payne
Washtenaw County / washtenaw.org

Earlier this month, the Washtenaw County Health Department released data regarding confirmed COVID-19 cases in the county.  The most disturbing information came out of Ypsilanti and Ypsilanti Township, in which there more infections among African-Americans than any other ethnicity.  WEMU's Lisa Barry and Concentrate Media's Sarah Rigg examine why this situation exists with Washtenaw County racial equity officer Alize Asberry Payne for this week's "On the Ground-Ypsi."


Washtenaw United WMBK My Brother's Keeper
David Fair / 89.1 WEMU

The "My Brother's Keeper" program was created by the Obama administration in 2014, and Washtenaw County was among the first to sign on.  Two representatives from Washtenaw My Brother's Keeper (WMBK), Rod Wallace and Jamall Bufford, talk to WEMU's David Fair about its latest projects for this week's "Washtenaw United."


Jorge Avellan / WEMU

Eastern Michigan University hosted a Martin Luther King Jr. Day luncheon Monday on campus.  89.1 WEMU's Jorge Avellan attended and has the story.


Alize Asberry Payne
Washtenaw County / washtenaw.org

Washtenaw County is one of the economically vibrant communities in southeast Michigan.  Yet, there are socio-economic and racial disparities to work through.  That is why the county has created the position of Racial Equity Officer.  Alize Asberry Payne is the first person to take the title and joined WEMU's David Fair to discuss the "One Community" initiative in this week's "Washtenaw United."


Lisa Barry / WEMU-FM

Washtenaw County has a new racial equity officer who's been on the job since late July.  89.1 WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Alize Asberry Payne about her plans to address racial inequity impacting many different aspects of life for county residents.


Ypsilanti City Council unanimously accepted the resignation of city manager Darren McClary Thursday.  It has raised issues of implicit bias and governmental transparency.  It may also be a red flag as to the working relationships between the Mayor Beth Bashert and members of city council.  The Mayor addresses these issues in a morning-after perspective conversation with WEMU's David Fair.

Today is your last day to register to vote in the August 7th Primary Election.  There is plenty of election -related activity going on this week and som other items of community interest and engagement, too.  Get all the details in this week's 'Civic Matters' with WEMU's David Fair and Mary Morgan, the executive director of the CivCity Initiative.