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solar eclipse

National Park Service

Did you get a chance to watch the recent solar eclipse?  If you did, according to University of Michigan researchers, you were among an unparalleled size crowd united in watching one event.


You could feel the excitement as both young and old viewed the Solar Eclipse at the Whittaker Branch of the Ypsilanti District Library.  About 650 people attended the historic event.


Newsweek

For those who watched the solar eclipse in our area it was a partial eclipse--still a sight to behold watching with NASA-approved solar glasses.  But for serious astronomers and those wanting a very rare solar experience... they traveled to a 70 mile swath of the country where the eclipse could be seen as a total eclipse.

89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry spoke to Eastern Michigan University professor of astronomy and director of Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance, who traveled to Ravenna, Nebraska to see a total eclipse and shares his enthusiastic experience.


NASA

Did you get outside and watch Monday’s eclipse?  It was not considered a "total eclipse" in our area, so the environmental impact was not that noticeable.

89.1 WEMU's Lisa Barry spoke with Tom Kasper, the Planetarium coordinator and lecturer in Astronomy at Eastern Michigan University, who traveled to a small town outside Jay Em, Wyoming so he could see the total eclipse.


WikiMedia Commons

Today is the day the first solar eclipse to be visible in North America in 40 years, and it will have skywatchers looking up in awe. Many of the serious astronomers from Washtenaw County left town to watch the solar eclipse it in its totality. But, closer to home, staff from the University of Michigan Museum of Natual History and some members of the U-M department of Astronomy will be watching from the Diag in Ann Arbor.


Every Monday morning, the executive director of the CivCity Initiative joins WEMU's David Fair  for a conversation on topics pertinent to Washtenaw County and the city of Ann Arbor. Mary Morgan will provide news, analysis, commentary and explain the various ways residents can become more engaged. 


American Academy of Ophthalmology/American Astronomical Society

The solar eclipse, which will be up to 90 percent visible in our area, is quickly approaching.  It's happening early in the afternoon on August 21st, and even though it will begin to look like nighttime in the middle of the day, there have been repeated warnings not to look at the sun during this process!

89.1 WEMU’s Lisa Barry spoke to Michigan Medicine ophthalmologist Dr. Rajesh Rao, who shared safety tips about viewing the eclipse.


Ypsilanti District Library

August 21st is the day there will be a total eclipse of the sun in North America.  Locally, it will be seen as a partial eclipse with 85 to 90 percent of the sun covered by the moon in the early afternoon.  There are several local watching events, including at the Ypsilanti District Library.

89.1 WEMU'S Lisa Barry spoke with Molly Beedon, youth services librarian for the Ypsilanti District Library, who talks about the NASA expert coming to speak on the day of the eclipse and that they have special eclipse watching glasses they are giving away.


WikiMedia Commons

It is the first total eclipse happening in nearly 40 years but will only be partially visible from Southeast Michigan.  I spoke with Eastern Michigan University professor and director of Sherzer Observatory Norbert Vance about what we can expect to see and experience when the eclipse occurs on August 21st.