Superfund

Christopher Taylor
City of Ann Arbor / a2gov.org

The Gelman 1,4 dioxane plume continues to spread in groundwater in the Ann Arbor area and could threaten the health of the Huron River and the city's municipal water supply. Ann Arbor Mayor Christopher Taylor joined WEMU's David Fair and Michigan League of Conservation Voters director Lisa Wozniak to discuss the latest on efforts to remediate the toxic pollution and where we go from here.


Washtenaw County

It’s official.  Washtenaw County is moving forward with plans to try to get the 1,4 dioxane plume in our area designated as a Superfund site.  


Washtenaw County

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners will discuss a resolution Wednesday night, that, if approved, would request a Superfund site designation for the 1, 4 dioxane plume in our area.  


Washtenaw County

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners has rejected a consent agreement regarding the 1,4 Dioxane plume in our area.  

Washtenaw County

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners needs more time to decide if they want to approve a consent agreement regarding the 1,4 Dioxane plume in our area.


Jason Morgan
Washtenaw County / washtenaw.org

The 1,4 dioxane plume emanating from the old Gelman Sciences facility on Wagner Road in Scio Township continues to expand through groundwater in the greater Ann Arbor area.  At a recent public forum, the federal Environmental Protection Agency said it would take decades to get the contamination designated as a Superfund site and clean-up could take decades beyond that.  In this week's "Issues of the Environment," WEMU's David Fair talks to Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners chair Jason Morgan about what is happening now to better address the environmental threat. 


the green room
Barbara Lucas - the Green Room / 89.1 WEMU

"Declare the Pall-Gelman 1, 4 dioxane plume a federal Superfund site."  That’s the message from the Sierra Club of Huron Valley.  The Sierra Club has passed a resolution urging the City of Ann Arbor and Washtenaw County to seek Superfund designation from the US Environmental Protection Agency. 

Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

  The National Priorities List is the list of hazardous waste sites in the United States eligible for long-term remedial action financed under the federal Superfund program.  Currently there are 1,171 sites on the NPL, either being cleaned up or waiting for their turn.  Should Ann Arbor’s 1,4-dioxane contamination be “listed” too?  Weighing benefits against potential stigma costs is the subject of this week’s Green Room segment in our ongoing series.


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

In 1980 Congress created the Superfund to clean up hazardous waste sites that have passed criteria placing them on the “National Priorities List.” If and when funding becomes available for a site, the EPA works with the state’s DEQ to remediate it.  When polluters can’t be made to pay to clean them up, the Superfund pays, using taxpayer money. In Michigan, there are currently 65 sites on the National Priorities List.  Should Ann Arbor become one of them?

 


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

For almost thirty years, a “responsible party” (Gelman Sciences, Inc.) has been legally and financially responsible for the 1, 4 dioxane contamination of  groundwater inthe Ann Arbor area.  This is in contrast to many contamination sites where cleanup falls totally on taxpayers. But the plume remains, and some question if enough resources are being devoted to its remediation.  In this installment of WEMU’s “The Green Room,” Barbara Lucas looks at money, and how it impacts Ann Arbor’s contamination problem.