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More than 200 people have been killed in coordinated bombings across Sri Lanka. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro gets the latest on the ground in Colombo from journalist Lisa Fuller.

On a bright Sunday afternoon in early March, the Tamir River in the steppes of Mongola becomes a bowling alley. Two dozen Mongolian herdsmen have gathered to play musun shagai, known as "ice shooting." Right now, the ice on the river is perfect. Clear and smooth. The players are cheerful and focused.

Their goal? To send a small copper puck called a zakh down a 93-yard stretch of ice and knock over several cow ankle bones, painted red, none bigger than a golf ball, at the other end. Extra points for hitting the biggest target, made of cow skin.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

More than 200 people were killed and hundreds more injured after explosions tore through Sri Lanka in a series of coordinated blasts that struck churches and hotels. It marked the country's worst violence since the end of its civil war in 2009.

The blasts started as people began gathering for Mass on Easter Sunday. In Colombo, the country's capital, blasts were reported at St. Anthony's Shrine and three high-end hotels: the Shangri-La, the Cinnamon Grand and the Kingsbury.

On-air challenge: I'm going to read you some sentences. Each one conceals the name of a U.S. city both phonetically and by spelling. Name the cities.

Example: The musician composed a crackerjack sonata in Mississippi --> JACKSON

1. The governor did a handspring fielding questions in Illinois.

2. My grandmother would belittle rocking chairs from Arkansas.

3. I'm looking for semipro vocational training in Utah.

4. Everyone hated to see Wilbur bankrupted in California.

5. Let's plan singalongs all around Michigan.

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At least 130 people have been killed in coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka that targeted luxury hotels and churches, as people gathered for Easter services.

The Iowa caucuses are still nine months away, and with at least 20 Democrats either considering a run or officially declared, many of them are looking for ways to stand out in the crowded field. One tried-and-true way: show up in voters' homes.

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Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Yellow vest protests grew violent on Saturday as firefighters battled several fires amid clouds of tear gas in eastern Paris.

Police in Northern Ireland have arrested two men in connection with the shooting death of a 29-year-old journalist in Londonderry on Thursday night.

Authorities say they arrested an 18- and 19-year-old under the U.K.'s controversial Terrorism Act and took them to the Musgrave Serious Crime Suite, a police station in Belfast.

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, This is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. And here is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you so much. We are taking the week off from news. We're getting outside. And we're enjoying some fresh air.

KURTIS: I love fresh air. Have you heard Terry Gross's interview with Conan O'Brien?

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: So much better than ours.

(LAUGHTER)

Panel Questions

Apr 20, 2019

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

And here is some more previously unaired material never been heard before.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We have time for one more segment as we take the week off to play outside. So let's hear from someone who spends most of his time playing inside.

BILL KURTIS: Orlando Magic star Aaron Gordon joined us onstage when we went down to Orlando in November. Peter looked so tiny next to him.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

SAGAL: You've got fans. I've got to ask you - I should admit I'm not, you know, conversant with, like, the basketball stuff - how is it that someone the size of the Statue of Liberty...

(LAUGHTER)

The latest book-length tell-all on life inside President Trump's White House has appeared, and it's just as unsparing about dysfunction and deception as all those earlier versions by journalists, gossip mavens and former staffers. Maybe more so.

The difference is that the president likes this one.

Or at least he says he likes it. And it's probably not because of the catchy title (Report on the Investigation Into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election), or any previous works by the author, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; Deaf and Hard of Hearing: 1-800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.


If you know someone struggling with despair, depression or thoughts of suicide, you may be wondering how to help.

Inmates are among the least-educated people in America. That's despite research that shows education is one of the most effective ways to keep people from coming back to prison.

Now, there's renewed interest in giving adults behind bars better access to higher education. A new bipartisan bill in Congress would allow incarcerated people to use federal Pell Grants — designed for low-income students — to pay for higher education, including college classes and workforce training.

The quiet of the late-winter morning is interrupted by a staccato of gunshots.

"Military drills," shrugs Kim Seung-ho, 58, the director of the DMZ Ecology Research Institute, a nonprofit organization that does research on the wildlife in the Demilitarized Zone, or DMZ, which is the border area between North and South Korea. A thick blanket of fog seeps over the forested hills on this late-winter morning as Kim stands, searching the horizon for birds, on the bank of the Imjin River just north of Paju, South Korea.

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The tunnel leading to Colombia's most famous church feels more like a byway into the bowels of the earth. It's dark and dank, with a faint smell of sulfur in the air. But after a few hundred yards, the shaft gradually widens to reveal Roman Catholic icons, like the Stations of the Cross and Archangel Gabriel.

And they're all carved out of salt.

Robin Wallace thought her years of working as a counselor in addiction treatment gave her a decent understanding of the system. She has worked in private and state programs in Massachusetts and with people who were involuntarily committed to treatment.

So in 2017, as her 33-year-old son, Sean Wallace, continued to struggle with heroin use — after years of coping with mental health issues and substance use — she thought she was making the right choice in forcing him into treatment.

More than 400 firefighters answered the call when fire broke out in the Notre Dame Cathedral this Holy Week. As Lieutenant Colonel Gabriel Plus, spokesperson for the Paris firefighters, told the Agence France Press, "One doesn't imagine as a Paris firefighter one day intervening to save Notre Dame!"

"Time worked against us," he said. "The wind was against us, and we needed to retake control."

Is it possible to raise children without shouting, scolding — or even talking to kids with an angry tone?

Last month, we wrote about supermoms up in the Arctic who pulled off this daunting task with ease. They use a powerful suite of tools, which includes storytelling, playful dramas and many questions.

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