89.1 WEMU

National News

Public health advocates have struggled to change the minds of these so called anti-vaxxers. But one South Carolina woman has a different approach: reaching parents before they even become parents.

Nigeria's president says anyone trying to tamper with Saturday's vote would do so at the "expense of his own life." The main opposition party accused him of making a "direct call for jungle justice."

ISIS has lost control of almost all of its territory after a years-long military campaign. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Associated Press reporter Sarah El Deeb, who is at the frontlines of the fight.

President Trump says European allies should take back citizens who left to join ISIS and put them on trial. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with anti-terrorism expert Peter Neumann about repatriation.

A convicted Chinese trafficker known as the "ivory queen" has been sentenced to 15 years in jail by a Tanzanian court.

Yang Fenglan, who has lived in Tanzania on and off for decades and operated a Chinese restaurant, was found guilty of working with two Tanzanian men to smuggle more than 800 pieces of ivory between 2000 and 2004, as Reuters reported.

USA Gymnastics has hired a new CEO: the embattled organization's fourth leader in the past two years. The organization is trying to get beyond a widening sexual abuse scandal.

A West Virginia school teachers strike was just hours old when lawmakers voted to postpone a bill that teachers opposed, effectively killing it.

Here's what's up with docs: They're doing great at the box office.

At last month's Sundance Film Festival, Knock Down the House broke the festival's documentary sales record: reportedly $10 million to Netflix. The film follows the 2018 campaigns of four female congressional candidates, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

For many years, three buckets full of uranium ore sat in a museum building at Grand Canyon National Park. Tours often visited the museum collection building, with children on tours sitting next to the buckets for a half-hour.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Saxophonist and composer Greg Ward's latest album, Stomping Off From Greenwood, is a tribute to Chicago, the city where he came of age as a musician. It's also one of the year's first great jazz albums.

The first time I played Ward's new album, I was riveted by its sense of momentum and possibility, and the way its easy movement among styles made music feel like an open city.

Updated at 6:03 p.m. ET

Once a celebrated investigative reporter, the publisher of a small Alabama newspaper achieved notoriety this week by saying the Ku Klux Klan should "clean out D.C."

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo says his department will stop serving "no knock" search warrants, weeks after a raid on a house left two married suspects dead and five officers injured. Acevedo also reiterated that the officer who led that raid may face criminal charges.

"The no-knock warrant's going to go away, kind of like leaded gasoline in our city," Acevedo said. He added that raids that stem from those warrants would only be used in very limited cases — and that they would not be used to nab people suspected of dealing small amounts of drugs.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Beleaguered USA Gymnastics has named a new president and CEO — its fourth in two years — as the sport's governing body battles criticism that it ignored and even enabled widespread sex abuse by former team doctor Larry Nassar.

For years, Spain had avoided the rise of far-right populists, dodging a trend sweeping other parts of Europe.

But recently, that all changed.

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe says it's not normal for the bureau to open investigations into the president.

"We don't have a lot of experience with investigating presidents of the United States," McCabe says. "There is not a standard S.O.P. on the shelf that you pull down to say, 'Here's how it's done.'"

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

President Trump pushed forward Tuesday with his plan to launch a space force as a new branch of the military. But it would at first be under the umbrella of the Air Force, and it requires approval of Congress — which is far from certain.

This represents at least a temporary shift. Trump had stated that he wanted a space force that is "separate but equal" from the Air Force.

A film about Queen Anne of Great Britain, The Favourite, by the unorthodox Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos, will probably cadge a few Oscars. Even if it doesn't, this comic and oddly moving film has already achieved something extraordinary. It has ignited widespread interest in the life of a corpulent, gouty, myopic, staunchly Anglican queen who allegedly had passionate relationships with two ladies of her bedchamber and who was pregnant 17 times but died childless before her 50th birthday about 300 years ago.

The Trump administration sought to rush the transfer of American nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia in potential violation of the law, a new report from the House Oversight and Reform Committee alleges.

Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings' staff issued an "interim staff" report Tuesday, citing "multiple whistleblowers" who raised ethical and legal concerns about the process.

The federal judge in Roger Stone's case has ordered him to appear in court this week following a critical post about her that was shared on his Instagram account.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson scheduled a hearing for Thursday at which Stone will be required to argue why Jackson should not alter the gag order she has imposed or reconsider the bail Stone was granted after his arrest.

One of the goals President Trump announced in his State of the Union address was to stop the spread of HIV in the U.S. within 10 years.

In addition to sending extra money to 48 mainly urban counties, Washington, D.C., and San Juan, Puerto Rico, Trump's plan targets seven states where rural transmission of HIV is especially high.

Designer Karl Lagerfeld Dies

11 hours ago

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld has died. He was a creative director at Chanel for more than 30 years. And he had his own signature style - those dark sunglasses, white ponytail and high, white collars. Joining us to remember Lagerfeld's legacy is Dana Thomas. She's a Paris-based reporter who has written about the fashion industry. Dana, thanks so much for being with us.

DANA THOMAS: My pleasure.

MARTIN: And I understand you interviewed Karl Lagerfeld a number of times. What was he like?

Karl Lagerfeld, the German designer who was the artistic director of Chanel and Fendi and also created his own brand, has died in Paris. For years, Lagerfeld sought to obscure his age; he was reportedly 85.

Lagerfeld worked with some of fashion's biggest design houses, showing a knack for reinventing classic styles with innovative flourishes. In the process, he brought Fendi to new heights in the 1960s and revamped Chanel after being named that brand's director in the 1980s.

George Mendonsa, the Navy sailor whose passionate kiss in Times Square symbolized a nation's exuberance over the end of World War II, has died. He was 95.

The photographer never got the name of the sailor, but Mendonsa claimed it was him, and many experts who analyzed his facial structure came to the same conclusion.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN WILLIAMS' "'STAR WARS' (MAIN TITLE)")

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. May the Force be with you, France. According to Time magazine, that country has formally recognized the sport of lightsaber dueling.

Pages