All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Lisa Barry who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The U.S. Capitol Police have close to 2,000 uniformed officers, more than the Atlanta Police Department.

The agency's annual budget is around half a billion dollars, which is larger than the budget for the entire Detroit Police Department.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Christopher Taylor
City of Ann Arbor / a2gov.org

The Gelman 1,4 dioxane plume continues to spread in groundwater in the Ann Arbor area and could threaten the health of the Huron River and the city's municipal water supply. Ann Arbor Mayor Christopher Taylor joined WEMU's David Fair and Michigan League of Conservation Voters director Lisa Wozniak to discuss the latest on efforts to remediate the toxic pollution and where we go from here.


Hannah Palmer / The Sunflower Project

Hannah Palmer just started her senior year at Eastern Michigan University, but before she even graduates, she is finding purpose in her own personal pain by creating "The Sunflower Project."

She talks with WEMU's Lisa Barry about the goal of the mental health nonprofit and how she hopes to help those dealing with mental health challenges, beginning by sharing her own struggles and finding ways to support others who do as well.


Last month, Ford announced it would allow staff who have been working remotely to remain remote — at least some of the time — long after the pandemic is over.

"Must be nice for them," thought Marcie Pedraza, an electrician at a Ford plant in Chicago. Like many workers across the U.S., from factories to grocery stores, working from home has never been an option for her. And that presents a challenge for companies frantically rewriting their remote work policies: How do you make the change feel fair, when not all employees can benefit?

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Sometimes when you go back to watch an older movie you love, it feels a little bit off - like, ooh, this hasn't aged well. University of Chicago film professor Jacqueline Stewart had that feeling with "Purple Rain," starring the one and only Prince.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Basil Babe / basil-babe.com

Known as "Basil Babe," the mother-and-daughter duo work together making Asian dumplings selling and serving them at pop-up events around Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. Lisa Barry speaks with the daughter, Thai Inhmathong, about how the business got started and what she envisions happening in the future.


State Theatre
Brandon C. / flickr.com

There's so much to talk about in the movie world, and we have two of the biggest movie fans around to do it.  For this week's "Cinema Chat," WEMU's Michael Jewett fills in for David Fair to talk about this week's cinematic releases with Michigan Theater Foundation executive director Russ Collins.


Riverside Arts Center / riversidearts.org

Ypsilanti's Riverside Arts Center has launched a new residency to give local artists time and space to create and connect with the community. Lisa Barry and Sarah Rigg talk to Kristen Schrader, chair of the program committee at Riverside Arts Center, about the new program, which is already proving to be popular.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Look. I wouldn't know what to do if a duck started nesting in a planter on my ninth floor balcony, but Steve Stuttard, an avid bird lover and retired Royal Navy specialist, was just the man for the job.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This week, ALL THINGS CONSIDERED turns 50. Joel Abrams of Boston recalls making dinner one night in 1991 and listening to a story about Haitian cane cutters in the Dominican Republic. Here is an unnamed cutter heard through an interpreter.

Cicada
Thomas O'Dell / Matthaei Botanical Gardens

Tom O'Dell, a collections and natural areas specialist at the University of Michigan's Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum, is excited for the 17-year return of the" "Noisy Brood X Periodical Cicadas." He talks with WEMU's Lisa Barry about what he considers to be "a natural wonder that occurs only in the United States, on Planet Earth every 17 years, which means it happens only four to five times in a person's lifetime!"


Watkins
Michigan Department of Natural Resources / dnr.state.mi.us

The natural parks found all over Washtenaw County are like a time capsule. They tell tales of local and state history, which is why their preservation is such a high priority. In this week's "Issues of the Environment," WEMU's David Fair talks about the work being done to protect and preserve these areas with Kira Macyda, a park planner and preservationist for Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation.


Voter turnout was just over 18% in several local elections that took place in Washtenaw County on Tuesday. WEMU's Lisa Barry has the full story:


There were zero reported deaths from college hazing incidents in 2020, but as campuses reopen to students, there have already been two hazing-related deaths this year. Eight men face a range of charges, including involuntary manslaughter, reckless homicide, evidence tampering and failure to comply with underage alcohol laws, after Stone Foltz, a sophomore at Bowling Green State University, died on March 7 of alcohol poisoning.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

On this program, we ask a lot of big questions. But we're now going to pose a few that are, well, less substantial.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1, BYLINE: Will my laptop get heavier if I put more files on it?

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Should spaghetti be way shorter?

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Ellie Snyder
Ellie Snyder / elliesnyder-comedy.com

Self-described as a "failed music student," Ellie Snyder says she decided to seek out attention in a new way: making strangers laugh in bars. Imagine the irony of being an aspiring comic during the least funny time: a pandemic. With her style of observational humor, Ellie tells Creative Washtenaw's Deb Polich and WEMU's David Fair her story on this edition of "creative: impact."


Updated May 3, 2021 at 9:51 PM ET

A senior Drug Enforcement Administration official told NPR efforts to target drug cartels operating inside Mexico have unraveled because of a breakdown in cooperation between law enforcement agencies and militaries in the two countries.

Monday, May 3, 2021, marks the 50th anniversary of NPR's first on-air original broadcast. In the last half century, NPR and Member stations have been essential, trusted sources for local events and cultural programming featuring music, local history, education and the arts. To mark this milestone, we're reflecting on — and renewing — our commitment to serve an audience that reflects America and to Hear Every Voice.


In the 50 years that All Things Considered has been on the air, the ground under journalism has shifted.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

With this program marking 50 years on the air today, listeners shared moments they heard here that stuck with them.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For Canice Flanagan of San Francisco, one such moment was in May 2008.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The United Kingdom is America's closest ally. The countries have fought wars together and helped build the liberal international order. But now America's old friend is at increasing risk of breaking apart.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2021 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Pages