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Look To The Sky Just Past Sunset To See Rare Comet Along The Northwest Horizon

Jul 13, 2020

Comet NEOWISE on the southeastern shore of Whitmore Lake on July 12, 2020.
Credit Glenn Kaatz

Some astronomers compare comets to cats.  They both have tails and are very hard to predict.

A recently discovered comet called NEOWISE can be seen even without binoculars in our area through July 23rd along the horizon in the northwest sky.

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum about the rare comet viewing and the best way to try and see it.


Dr. Brian Ottum
Credit Lisa Barry / 89.1 WEMU

Sky watchers are in for a rare treat as a recently discovered comet named "NEOWISE" will be viewable in the night sky in our area for the next 10 days.

Saline amateur astronomer Dr. Brian Ottum says it can be seen in the northwest sky just after sunset...even without binoculars.

The comet, which is around a three mile-wide chunk of rock, ice, and dust, is now moving away from the sun and will be viewable every evening after sunset through around July 23rd.

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— Lisa Barry is the host of All Things Considered on WEMU. You can contact Lisa at 734.487.3363, on Twitter @LisaWEMU, or email her at lbarryma@emich.edu