89.1 WEMU

All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00PM-7:00PM

WEMU's All Things Considered local host is Lisa Barry who anchors all local news segments during the program.

NPR's All Things Considered paints the bigger picture with reports on the day's news, analysis of world events, and thoughtful commentary.

With coronavirus cases continuing to climb and hospitals facing the prospect of having to decide how to allocate limited staff and resources, the Department of Health and Human Services is reminding states and health care providers that civil rights laws still apply in a pandemic.

States are preparing for a situation when there's not enough care to go around by issuing "crisis of care" standards.

But disability groups are worried that those standards will allow rationing decisions that exclude the elderly or people with disabilities.

Your Anti-Anxiety Playlist

3 hours ago

Listeners tell us the music that helps them de-stress during this life-changing time.

Last month, Habibi released Anywhere But Here, the band's first full-length album since its self-titled debut in 2014. Just like that first record and the EPs and singles over the past six years, the new album is full of Habibi's signature mix of psychedelic rock and Iranian music.

In Berlin, reminders of the city's violent past are everywhere. Somber monuments, museums, stumbling stones and plaques dot nearly every block. "Germany is seen around the world as a model for how a country can face its past — and it has done that in a way few countries have," says journalist James Angelos.

Joe Wick's Fitness Tips For Self-Isolation

4 hours ago

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with fitness coach Joe Wicks about his new at-home, online workout for kids, "P.E. with Joe."

Countries all over the world are being impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. We hear how nations in the Middle East, Africa and Latin America are responding.

Fresh Start Clubhouse / https://freshstartclubhouse.org/

The coronavirus crisis has caused layoffs at an organization in Ann Arbor that offers mental health services.  WEMU's Jorge Avellan has the details.

Ann Arbor Meals on Wheels

Ann Arbor's Meals on Wheels has made changes to its delivery service because of the coronavirus pandemic.  WEMU's Jorge Avellan has the story. 


A host of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour takes a look at how the coronavirus is affecting cultural production — and offers some recommendations for home entertainment.

NPR's business correspondent addresses listener concerns about retail workers and talks about about best practices for consumers as the coronavirus epidemic worsens.

NPR's business correspondent answers listener questions about economic sectors that are booming, working in retail and supporting small businesses in the middle of the coronavirus emergency.

Most of the gargantuan sum of money in the coronavirus bill Congress just passed is dealing with the economic crisis, not the public health one.

"Most of the bill is on emergency relief to people and unemployment insurance," says Loren Adler, associate director of USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy. "The health care provisions are, in some sense, secondary."

Mike Michelon
Lisa Barry / 89.1 WEMU

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted another local arts organization.  WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with the executive director of the Ann Arbor Summer Festival, Mike Michelon, about their decision to cancel all indoor ticket events for the upcoming season.


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The $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill contains a lot of help for a lot of industries, but what's in there for health care? NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin gives us the highlights.

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: Most of that gargantuan sum of money is dealing with the economic crisis here, not the public health one, going to things like emergency relief for various industries, unemployment insurance and the like. For health, the biggest-ticket item is $100 billion for hospitals and health care providers.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The nation's 15 days of social distancing are nearly over. And while many states have issued stay-at-home orders for much longer periods of time, new guidance from the White House coronavirus task force is due soon.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Gem
Lisa Barry / 89.1 WEMU

Saying they are always looking for ways to be creative, Gem Advocacy Group co-founders Dr. Benjamin Edmondson and Jason Gold launched an online reading series to help kids from elementary school age to high school engage in literacy, while all schools are closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

WEMU's Lisa Barry talks with the Washtenaw County area men about their effort.

Debbie Dingell
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

Coronavirus has been confirmed in all 50 states.  Michigan's 12th District Congresswoman, Debbie Dingell, is working from home as some members of Congress have confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, and members of her staff are awaiting test results.  In a conversation with WEMU's David Fair, Dingel says the CARES bill the U.S. House will pass today is a start, but it's imperfect.  Therefore, work will begin immediately on providing more financial assistance.  

Rebekah Warren
Michigan House Democrats / housedems.com

As the coronavirus outbreak continues to affect daily life in Michigan, the state Legislature is at work to provide stop-gap and longer term aid to those in need. 55th District State Representative Rebekah Warren addressed a myriad of issues with WEMU's David Fair.  


Chenille
The Chenille Sisters

During the COVID-19 pandemic, anything that can lift spirits helps out.  One nationally recognized musician out of Ann Arbor seeks to do just that with her craft.  In this installment of "WEMU Reaches Out: COVID-19 Conversations," Barbara Lucas catcves up with  Grace Morand of the Chenille Sisters, who's been using music to cope.


Rick Pluta / MPRN

School officials will have to make some tough decisions very soon about the rest of the school year.  One of them is whether to send layoff notices to teachers and other school staff who aren’t working.  That would save money for later in case the school year is extended to make up for days lost due to the COVID-19 outbreak.  School officials have sent a letter to Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the Legislature.  They’re asking the state to provide some certainty to parents, school staff, and students.  We have more from Rick Pluta.


WISD

School districts across Washtenaw County are facing technological challenges to continue educating students as they stay at home.


A2Y Chamber

Many local businesses are struggling to make ends meet during the coronavirus pandemic.  WEMU's Jorge Avellan tells us about one organization's efforts to help.


Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

For 6-year-old Sadie Hernandez, the first day of online school started at her round, wooden kitchen table in Jacksonville, Fla. She turned on an iPad and started talking to her first grade teacher, Robin Nelson.

"Are you ready to do this online stuff?" her teacher asks, in a video sent to NPR by Hernandez's mother, Audrey.

"Yeah," Sadie responds.
"It's kind of scary isn't it?"
"Kind of."

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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We are all cooped up at home a lot now.

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Oh, yeah. And with gyms closed, it can be really hard to get in your regular workouts. So we asked experts for tips on staying active while hunkering down.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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UMS
University Musical Society / ums.org

Another impact of the current health pandemic is on our cultural life.  In this edition of "Art and Soul," WEMU’s Lisa Barry talks with Matthew VanBesien, president of the University Musical Society at the University of Michigan, about what they’ve had to do in light of COVID-19 and orders to stay home and social distance from each other.


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