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UM study says screen time worsening children's eyesight

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Kid using screen time.

Studies have shown there is a correlation between excessive screen time and near-sightedness in kids. A new survey from the University of Michigan shows that not all parents are getting the message.

More than 2,000 parents nationally were surveyed about their approach to screen time with their kids. Despite the scientific evidence, which shows an increase in near-sightedness globally, just 49% of parents said screen time was having a major impact on their children’s eye health.

Sarah Clark from the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll says finding a balance is key.

“So, set those limits on the amount of screen time, but there’s an important companion to that, which is, encourage outdoor time. Because the other thing that researchers are finding is that there’s a protective effect of being outdoors.”

Clark says 1-2 hours of outdoor time per day is also good for adults, but more important for children whose eyes are still developing.

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Josh Hakala is the general assignment reporter for the WEMU news department.
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