Christopher Intagliata

Introducing the amazing spring-loaded larva.
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There's a new move in gymnastics unlike any that's come before.

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The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts, one half of the married lounge act Marty & Elayne, died last week at 89.

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OK. Get ready, world. There's a new move in gymnastics unlike any that's come before.

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Today we remember a hero, a pioneer and a veteran of three wars who was among the all-Black Tuskegee Airmen.

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The U.S. is now averaging more than 400,000 new COVID-19 cases a day. This comes after a week where new case counts shattered the previous day's records again and again. And even those staggering numbers are probably an undercount.

Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told NPR last week that with so many people testing at home, it is hard to capture the true number of cases.

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On January 1, some 400,000 songs, speeches and sound effects entered the public domain. The sounds were all recorded before 1923 and include oddities like this.

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Amid the omicron surge, there is understandable anxiety among parents, particularly those with kids under 5 who can't yet get a COVID-19 vaccine.

They're wondering how to navigate life with young children, what this means for travel plans and day care, and when the vaccine will become available.

Ibukun Kalu is a pediatric infectious disease doctor at Duke University and says her hospital has already seen a rise in children being admitted.

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After analyzing 26 years worth of European soccer matches, scientists have determined that the games have become more predictable over time — and the home field advantage has vanished.

Victor Martins Maimone and Taha Yasseri, Football is becoming more predictable; Network analysis of 88 thousands matches in 11 major leagues

Just like humans, groups of baboons sometimes break off relations. Scientists have studied the dynamics of such breakups and say baboons tend to split up in a cooperative, egalitarian way.

Brian A. Lerch et al, Better baboon breakups: collective decision theory of complex social network fissions

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For nearly a decade, scientists have been eavesdropping on killer whales in the Arctic.

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As the climate changes, our seasons are changing, too.

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Every year, Monarch butterflies from all over the Western U.S. migrate to coastal California to escape harsh winter weather. In the 1980s and '90s, more than a million made the trip. Lately, those numbers have fallen.

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Scientists have found something strange has been happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon in recent years.

Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were also shrinking in size.

"We found that size is not only shrinking for those sensitive species — it was declining for everyone," said researcher Vitek Jirinec of Louisiana State University.

Jirinec's findings are contained in a new study published in the journal Science Advances last Friday.

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In recent years, scientists found something strange was happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon. Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were shrinking in size.

The United States has seen a decline in cases and hospitalizations since the summer's delta surge — but the decline is declining.

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Can a name save lives? The city of Seville in Spain is betting it can.

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Yesterday, the mayor announced a new program - the world's first to give official names to severe heat waves.

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Wildlife biologist Greg LeClair has been obsessed with amphibians since he was a kid, when one rainy day, a black and yellow spotted salamander stumbled into his driveway in Maine.

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Winter is coming, and for many people, it will be a very cold one because something wild is happening in the energy market. Oil and gas prices in the U.S. are way up. In Europe and Asia, coal and natural gas prices just hit record highs.

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