ticks

Howard Russell
Michigan State University College of Agriculture & Natural Resources / canr.msu.edu

It's a great time of year to get outdoors! But, there are some potentially harmful critters waiting for you. Ticks have expanded their habitat in Michigan, and there is a major increase in the populations in Washtenaw County and Southeast Michigan. WEMU's David Fair checked in with Michigan State University entomologist Howard Russell to find out why that is and what we can do to keep ourselves and our pets safe. 


Ticks
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

Did you know the summer of 2016 was the first in which Lyme disease is thought to have originated in Washtenaw County?  It was.  Now, 2017 is predicted to be a particularly bad year for ticks.  In this week’s edition of WEMU’s "Issues of the Environment," David Fair explores why that is and what you can do about it with a medical entomologist from Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.


Michigan State University Extension

The Lone Star tick is not invading Michigan. According to a Michigan State University entomologist, the tick’s population hasn’t increased here in 25 years.

 It is peak season for the ticks that carry Lyme Disease. In this week's installment of Issues of the Environment, WEMU's David Fair talks with Erik Foster. Erick is Medical Entomologist with the Michigan Department of Community Health's communicable Disease Division. They discuss how to protect yourself from contracting Lyme Disease, what to look for if you suspect you've come in contact with an infected Tick, and how climate change may increase the areas where the ticks are found.