Gelman Sciences

Christopher Taylor
City of Ann Arbor / a2gov.org

The Gelman 1,4 dioxane plume continues to spread in groundwater in the Ann Arbor area and could threaten the health of the Huron River and the city's municipal water supply. Ann Arbor Mayor Christopher Taylor joined WEMU's David Fair and Michigan League of Conservation Voters director Lisa Wozniak to discuss the latest on efforts to remediate the toxic pollution and where we go from here.


Washtenaw County

It’s official.  Washtenaw County is moving forward with plans to try to get the 1,4 dioxane plume in our area designated as a Superfund site.  


Washtenaw County

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners will discuss a resolution Wednesday night, that, if approved, would request a Superfund site designation for the 1, 4 dioxane plume in our area.  


Washtenaw County

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners has rejected a consent agreement regarding the 1,4 Dioxane plume in our area.  

Washtenaw County

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners needs more time to decide if they want to approve a consent agreement regarding the 1,4 Dioxane plume in our area.


Washtenaw County

A virtual public question-and-answer Zoom meeting will be held Thursday, September 24th at 6:30 pm to discuss a proposed consent judgement between Gelman Sciences and other parties involved, regarding the 1,4 dioxane plume clean-up in our area.  

Debbie Dingell
Office of Congresswoman Debbie Dingell

School is resuming across the country, but financial concerns weigh heavily as the federal government has yet to vote on a new budget or coronavirus relief measure.  12th District Congresswoman Debbie Dingell joined WEMU's David Fair to express her concerns and weigh in on a number of local and national environmental issues.  


Brian Steglitz
City of Ann Arbor / a2gov.org

For decades, a 1,4 dioxane plume has contaminated groundwater in Scio Township and Ann Arbor.  Legal battles have been ongoing with the original polluter, Gelman Sciences, and its subsequent owners.  Now, a new consent judgement has been reached and it is expected to improve the situation.  In this week's "Issues of the Environment," WEMU's David Fair talks with the City of Ann Arbor's water treatment services manager, Brian Steglitz, about the agreement and what needs to happen next to get the settlement approved and implemented. 


Wiki Commons

Members of the public now have access to proposed settlement documents in legal proceedings regarding the 1,4 dioxane plume contamination in Washtenaw County.  

Washtenaw County

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners will hold a special closed session Wednesday night to discuss ongoing litigation regarding the 1,4 dioxane plume.  

City of Ann Arbor

The City of Ann Arbor says it will once again focus on addressing the 1,4 dioxane plume clean-up in Washtenaw County.  

Jason Morgan
Washtenaw County / washtenaw.org

The 1,4 dioxane plume emanating from the old Gelman Sciences facility on Wagner Road in Scio Township continues to expand through groundwater in the greater Ann Arbor area.  At a recent public forum, the federal Environmental Protection Agency said it would take decades to get the contamination designated as a Superfund site and clean-up could take decades beyond that.  In this week's "Issues of the Environment," WEMU's David Fair talks to Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners chair Jason Morgan about what is happening now to better address the environmental threat. 


Jorge Avellan / WEMU

After more than 30 years of dealing with a 1,4 dioxane plume emanating from the old Gelman Sciences facility on Wagner Road in Scio Township, a superfund site designation option is being highly considered.  Representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency attended a community meeting Thursday night in Ann Arbor to answer questions about a possible designation.  89.1 WEMU's Jorge Avellan was there and has the story.


Roger Rayle
Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

The 1,4 dioxane plume emanating from the old Gelman Sciences Facility on Wagner Road in Scio Township has caused environmental damage and remains a threat to public health.  In this week's "Issues of the Environment," WEMU's David Fair has a conversation with Roger Rayle, who is both chair of the Coalition for Action on Remediation of Dioxane (CARD) and Scio Residents for Safe Water (SRSW), about the ongoing efforts to remediate the dioxane plume.


Evan Pratt
Washtenaw County

Amid PFAS contamination, controversial oil and gas pipelines, and lead contamination, another water safety issue in Washtenaw County sometimes drops out of the public discourse.  The expanding 1,4 dioxane plume in the Ann Arbor area has again reared its head.  In this week's "Issues of the Environment," WEMU's David Fair talks to Washtenaw County Water Resources Commissioner Evan Pratt about the steps being taken after recent testing revealed much higher levels of the chemical in the waters in Ann Arbor's West Park. 

Catch a brief wrap-up of the November 7th elections, a look ahead to the release of a public survey on policing and community relations in Ann Arbor and important information on how to safely dispose of your home toxics.   It's all a part of the conversation between WEMU's David Fair and the CivCity Initiative's Mary Morgan on this week's edition of "Civic Matters." 


Lisa Wozniak
Michigan League of Conservation Voters / michiganlcv.org

The 1,4 Dioxane plume emanating from the old Gelman Sciences facility in Scio Township is moving slowly moving towards the Huron River and, if left unchecked, could be dangerous to Ann Arbor's drinking water.  In this month's edition of "1st Friday Focus on the Environment," Michigan League of Conservation Voters executive director Lisa Wozniak speaks to Mitch Adelman from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality about what is being done to contain this hazardous situation.


Yousef Rabhi
Michigan House Democrats / housedems.com

A week after a public forum on the 1,4 dioxane plume contaminating groundwater in Scio Township and Ann Arbor, you’ll get the latest on what is being done to address the problem. The potential carcinogen continues to spread in groundwater from the old Gelman Sciences facility on Wagner Road in Scio Township, slowly moving towards the Huron River. In this week’s "Issues of the Environment," WEMU’s David Fair catches up with State Representative Yousef Rabhi (D-Ann Arbor) to see what is being done to move from plume containment to actual clean-up. 


Several elected officials will update the public and listen to concerns this week on the ongoing 1.4 dioxane contamination plume int he Ann Arbor area. Changes in parking enforcement are under discussion. How can you participate? Find out in this week's "Civic Matters" with WEMU's David Fair and Mary Morgan of the CivCity Initiative. 


Christopher Taylor
City of Ann Arbor / a2gov.org

In this week's "Issues of the Environment," WEMU's David Fair speaks to Ann Arbor Mayor Christopher Taylor about environmental accomplishments in 2016 and the goals and objectives for 2017.


1,4 Dioxane
Wikipedia Media Commons / wikipedia.org

Washtenaw County, along with the city of Ann Arbor and the Huron River Watershed Council, will legally be able to intervene in discussions about the 1,4 Dioxane situation in our area.  


Washtenaw County
jimmywayne / flickr.com

A Washtenaw County Circuit Court judge will hear a motion this morning at 9AM regarding the 1,4 Dioxane situation in our area.  


Washtenaw County Public Health
Washtenaw County / ewashtenaw.org

Washtenaw County, along with the its health department and health officer, has taken legal action on isses related to the area's 1,4 Dioxane contamination plume. 


Jorge Avellan / 89.1 WEMU

For decades, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has been working with Gelman Sciences to clean-up the 1,4 Dioxane chemical the company released in certain parts of Ann Arbor.  To this day, the DEQ continues to say the levels are below their precautionary standards and are not harmful. To give voice to concerned residents, city, county and state officials put together Thursday night's town hall forum. 


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

As concern rises and detection methods improve, 1,4-Dioxane is being discovered in water sources across the country. Central to formulating remediation plans is determination of the safe level of exposure to this probable human carcinogen. What constitutes a true hazard as opposed to an “acceptable risk?”  Barbara Lucas goes in search of the answer in this 24th installment in our series on the Ann Arbor area’s 1.4 Dioxane Plume in “The Green Room.” 


City of Tucson

At a September work session, Ann Arbor City Council members asked city staff if the current water treatment plant could accommodate equipment to remove 1,4 dioxane,  just in case it becomes necessary in the future.  In this installment of 89.1 WEMU’s “The Green Room,” we look at what such a water treatment process looks like in action.


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

Ann Arbor’s dioxane plume is rather unusual, in that it emanates from just one source. That source is the old Gelman Sciences facility on Wagner Road in Scio Township. Other area's of dioxane contamination around the country, such as  the KL Avenue Landfill in Kalamazoo, have many “Responsible Parties” contributing to the contamination problem. Even with a single source, assigning responsibility for clean-up remains complicated in Ann Arbor.  In this installment of "The Green Room"  we try to untangle the confusing web of who is who when it comes to liability. 


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

The cast of players involved with Ann Arbor’s dioxane problem has changed many times over in the thirty years since the contamination was first discovered.  Some say that’s part of the problem:  it’s hard to stay motivated to tackle problems that go on seemingly indefinitely. Luckily, there are a few people in the community who have stuck with it, keeping the issue in the public forum.  In this segment of WEMU’s “The Green Room,” we talk with one of them.


Barbara Lucas / 89.1 WEMU

While the federal advisory level is 3.5 parts per billion, the amount of dioxane the State of Michigan allows in drinking water is 85 ppb, one of the highest standards in the country.  High levels mean less extensive remediation plans, a boon to industries responsible for the cleanups.  But, could the resulting water pollution negatively impact other businesses, and the local economy in general?  In this installment of  WEMU’s “The Green Room,” Barbara Lucas looks at various perspectives on this question.

In our previous 18-installments on the Ann Arbor area’s 1, 4 dioxane plume, we’ve heard from citizens, scientists, and government officials; both locally and from other dioxane sites around the country. Meanwhile, requests for interviews with the “Responsible Party”—Gelman Sciences, Pall Corporation or Danaher, are all met with silence.  In this episode of “The Green Room,” we learn, that wasn’t always the case. 


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